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If you have been prescribed medicine for your eczema, take it as directed. When all else fails, your doctor may be able to help ease your symptoms by prescribing you something a little stronger than what you can get over the counter. While no one really wants to rely on medication, sometimes it is necessary.

Some researchers have linked eczema to a Vitamin D deficiency. Therefore, a little bit of sunlight may help your condition. Do not go overboard, however. Spend about ten minutes in the sun each day. If you are going to be out longer than that, apply sunscreen and go about your business.

Control your indoor temperature. Eczema tends to flare up during shifts in temps or humidity. Use your air conditioner to stay cool in the warmer months. A humidifier can help you keep your skin from drying out during colder weather. Staying comfortable temp wise will help reduce the frequency of flare ups.

Avoid becoming overheated. Excess sweat can trigger eczema flare-ups. If you do work out, take a shower afterwards. In fact, shower after any bout of strenuous activity, which could include things like gardening or heavy housework. Keeping your skin clean will help to keep you comfortable and your eczema flare-ups at bay.

The temperature within your home should always be kept at a comfortable level. If it gets too hot or too cold, your skin may react to the environmental conditions that it is in. Use devices in your home that can help regulate the temperature. Humid air prevents your skin from getting too dry.